Open panel

Biopsychology seminar

Goals

  • Provide a forum for the presentation of work done by members of the behavioral neuroscience group.
  • Provide feedback concerning the material presented and the quality of the presentation.
  • Stimulate creativity and provide a basis for the development of critical thinking.
  • Hope that all this leads to publications and grants.

Types of Presentations

  • Design of a research project.
  • Data already collected as part of an ongoing project.
  • Professional issues.
  • Special faculty presentations.
  • Invited speakers.

Student Presentations

  • Plan to speak for about 20 min.
  • Use Power Point or similar.
  • Divide your talk as you would organize a paper.

Emphasis

  • Theoretical and applied relevance of the problem.
  • The method used or proposed.
  • The data obtained or expected.
  • Future directions.

Group Participation

  • Expect suggestions for improving your research and presentation.
  • Write down suggestions for future reference.
  • Think of the seminar as a friendly context to practice your scientific skills.

History

  • The Biopsychology Seminar started in 1994 and has been scheduled every semester since then.
  • Some invited speakers who contributed over the years include:
    • Abram Amsel (University of Texas, Austin)
    • Robert Batsell (Southern Methodist University)
    • Alan Daniel (Glenville State College)
    • Mike Domjan (University of Texas, Austin)
    • Perry Fuchs (University of Texas, Arlington)
    • Sue Grigson (Pennsylvania State University)
    • Masato Ishida (Osaka University of Education, Japan)
    • Joshua Jessel (Child Study Center, Fort Worth)
    • Bruce Overmier (University of Minnesota)
    • Jacob Norris (Naval Medical Research Center, Maryland)
    • Todd Roberts (University of Texas, Southwestern)
    • Tohru Taniuchi (Kanazawa University, Japan)
    • Carmen Torres (University of Jaen, Spain)
    • Christopher Watts (Texas Christian University)
    • Isabelle Muzzio (University of Texas San Antonio)

Schedule: Fall Semester, 2017 

WEEKLY MEETING TIME — Wednesdays 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
LOCATION — DEPARTMENT CONFERENCE ROOM; WIN 245

BIOPSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR
SCHEDULE – FALL 2017
9:00-10:00, Wednesdays, WIN 245

Biopsychology seminar

SCHEDULE OF SPEAKERS

1/17 – Discussion of recent article readings
1/24 – Christopher Hagen
1/31 – INVITED TALK
Tracy Centanni (TCU, Psychology)
“A novel approach for driving neural plasticity during reading acquisition”
Abstract. Although dyslexia is the most common developmental disorder, we still do not have an approach to intervention that works for every child. The rates of successful intervention drop even further when the diagnosis is not made early in life (prior to around 3rd grade). To help improve success rates, we propose to evaluate whether stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve is effective in improving fluency during reading acquisition. For the first experiment in this study, we will evaluate this paradigm using TCU students learning to recognize Hebrew letters. I will discuss the rationale for the selection of this nerve and the proposed mechanisms by which it drives neural plasticity, as well as detail the methods for our upcoming study on this approach.

2/7 – Sara Guarino
2/14 – Joanna Thompson
2/21 – Lauren Cleland
2/28 – INVITED TALK – NO MEETING AT THE REGULAR HOUR
Invited Talk: 3:30 pm, Wednesday, 2/28, WIN 228
Christa McIntyre (University of Texas, Dallas)
“Vagus Nerve Stimulation Enhances Extinction of Conditioned Fear in a Rat Model of PTSD”
Abstract. The vagus nerve serves as a bridge between the peripheral autonomic nervous system and the brain. It signals the brain during times of high sympathetic activity, promoting rapid storage of memories that are important for survival. As part of the parasympathetic nervous system, activation of the vagus nerve counteracts the peripheral effects of the sympathetic stress response. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve is approved for use in humans to treat medication-refractory epilepsy and depression. Emerging evidence suggests that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may be a beneficial adjunct to exposure-based therapies through its pairing-specific enhancement of memory consolidation and concurrent suppression of anxiety. In this talk, I will share our preclinical findings indicating that VNS enhances extinction of conditioned fear in a rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

3/7 – – INVITED TALK
Mike Chumley (TCU, Biology)
“Something about genetically modified mice”
3/14 – SPRING BREAK – NO MEETING
3/21 – Julia Peterman
3/28 – Shannon Conrad

4/4 – Reagan Cox
4/11 –Cheyenne Elliott
4/18 – INVITED TALK ON FRIDAY – NO MEETING AT THE REGULAR HOUR
Invited Talk: 11:00 am, Friday, 4/20 (room TBA)
Dr. Paul Paulus (Dept of Psychology, U Texas, Arlington)
“Collaborative Creativity: Tapping the Creative Potential of Groups”
Abstract. Many innovative activities occur in groups or teams such as in the areas of science and technology. Although such collaborations have yielded positive outcomes, much research suggests that most groups will underperform. We will highlight the factors that appear to be important for groups to tap their creative potential.
4/25 – Kelly Brice

5/2 – Bailey Devine